cockroach
Termidor versus Termite Baiting Systems
Termidor
diagram 1

Termidor liquid termiticide is injected into the soil to make a continuous treatment zone all the way around the foundation of a structure.

Baiting System
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Termite bait stations are placed in the soil several feet apart around a structure.

The First Day
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Termidor: Termites crawling through the soil will come in contact with the Termidor as they try to get into the house.

diamgram 2

Bait Systems: Termites crawling in the soil will have to "find" the bait station. There is nothing in the bait station to "attract" termites. They must bump into these monitors by chance and they are several feet apart.

The First Day
diagram 1

Termidor:Termites have come in contact with Termidor and it has been transferred to others in the colony. Many have already died, but the "Transfer Effect" continues to spread to those who have not even gone into the "Treated Zone".

diamgram 2

Bait System: Still no signs of termite activity in the stations. Have they bypassed the stations and entered your home?

*Remember, 8 feet apart is like a a quarter mile to a human.

Remember: When a termite travels 8 feet, that is similar to a person walking a quarter mile -- and many times the termite bait stations are more than 8 feet apart!

Three Months Later
diagram 1

Termidor:Termidor: 100% Control! No more termites to damage your home.

And the Termidor is still in the soil around your home, providing protection against any new invading termite colonies.

diamgram 2

Bait Systems:Some termites might have found the monitors at this point. However, unless there is sufficient activity, the PCO still might not apply any bait material yet. Even if there is enough termite activity to bait, those critters may still be feeding on your home, too.

TERMIDOR VERSUS BAITING SYSTEMS

The following articles are condensed from three research studies by Michael F. Potter, Extension Entomologist at the University of Kentucky.

Kentucky has thousands of wooden tobacco barns spread across the state. UK is very involved in termite research because of the economic impact of termite's in this agricultural economy.


Consumer update: Termite Baits
by
Michael F. Potter, Extension Entomologist University of Kentucky.

To Bait or Not to Bait… The biggest complaint, common to all of the current systems, is that baiting is a slow, prolonged process; several months may pass before the termites find the untreated, below ground monitoring stations and begin to feed on the bait. Consequently, it is not uncommon for the elimination procedure to take more than a full year to complete. Although usually minimal, some degree of termite feeding and damage may occur before the slow-acting bait takes effect.


Baiting programs often are more expensive than conventional treatments. This is because the process requires multiple visits to the structure to monitor for termites, and to add or replenish baits as needed. Homeowners should consider both the initial treatment price and the annual renewal fee in making their purchasing decision. Failure to maintain their annual service agreement is a prescription for disaster with baits, since there is no residual pesticide left in the soil after the termites have been eliminated. Ongoing structural protection depends upon diligent monitoring for new evidence of termites in the future.


Sentricon - The most widely used termite bait is the Sentricon Colony Elimination System. While there is still much to learn about Sentricon, dozens of independent research trials have confirmed its effectiveness when properly installed and diligently serviced by an authorized pest control firm.


Firstline - some pest control firms are using this product as an alternative to Sentricon. Most are using the bait in combination with other forms of treatment, rather than as a "stand alone, " as is often done with Sentricon. Research trials with Firstline have been inconclusive, and it has been difficult to determine what impact the bait, alone, is having on active termite infestations.


Spectracide Terminate - (This is the do-it-yourself product sold at Wal-Mart, Home Depot, Lowe's etc.) The Federal Trade Commission and eight state Attorneys General (including Kentucky) filed a complaint in U.S. District Court alleging that the advertising claims about the product are deceptive and unsubstantiated. This do-it-yourself termite bait is discussed at length in our entomology extension publication Entfact-642. DO-IT-Yourself Termite Baits: Do They Work? (Visit http:www.UKY.edu for more information.)

Termidor- Non-repellent Liquid Treatment
The new Termite Killers
by
Michael F. Potter and Anne E. Hillery
University of Kentucky Entomology

New, non-repellent termiticides seem to be performing differently than their predecessors and new information suggests that these termite-killing materials may indeed be special. Termidor, the newest non-repellent to enter the market, has attracted much interest---in part from being the first product since chlordane to provide 100% control at all U.S. Department of Agriculture field sites at all rates (including the labeled rate) in both the concrete-slab and ground-board tests.


A BIGGER BAZOOKA. Our preliminary findings with Termidor suggest that the new non-repellent may be more forgiving than anyone had imagined. Judging from the effects on termites in our monitoring stations, it appears that the product is performing much like a "zone defense" in a game of basketball, i.e., the structure (basket) is protected even though there are areas of soil (basketball court) left unprotected.

Thinking "Outside" the Box
The new Termite Killers
by
Michael F. Potter and Anne E. Hillery
University of Kentucky Entomology

Will exterior-only termite treatments work? Our study was designed to answer two related questions: First whether subterranean termites in buildings could be eliminated by exterior-only, liquid termiticide application; and second, could such treatments reduce or eliminate foraging activity around structures. Evaluation sites included 10 structures in central Kentucky-seven tobacco barns and three houses.


Example House #2-The house was trenched and rodded with Termidor on October 13, 2000. No treatment was done inside the basement, garage or crawl space, and the only area of drilling was where the front porch slab abutted the foundation. Eleven days after treatment, emissions detector reading inside the basement along the sill plate plummeted almost to zero. No termites were detected during two subsequent readings. These results are remarkable, considering that neither the basement, crawl space or garage interior were treated.


Study Implications. Consider the six structures treated with Termidor: all 34 infested monitoring stations within 2 to 10 feet of the exterior treated trench were inactive after one to three months. These results are remarkable, considering the high pretreatment infestations levels, and that more than half of the active monitors were on the interior of structures.